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Easy, Homemade Dog Treats with only 2 Ingredients

Easy, Homemade Dog Treats with only 2 Ingredients

Whether it’s your dog’s birthday, or maybe you just have some extra time on your hands, or maybe you just want to make homemade dog treats instead of buying them from the store, pretty much every dog owner has wanted to make their own dog treats at some point or another.

If you Google, there are literally hundreds of recipes. There are even homemade dog treat kits and electric dog treat baking machines!

Disclaimer: This post contains an affiliate link, which means that I get a small commission, at no additional cost to you, if you make a qualifying purchase. 

If you want quick an easy treats, this is the recipe for you! Bonus – this recipe easily makes about 500 treats! You read that right – 500 treats! In order to make the treats, you will need this silicone baking mat. Using this mat is what allows you to get 500 treats at one time! Now, the cool thing about this mat is that it is actually made to collect grease from meat you cook in the oven. So, it actually serves two purposes! (Just obviously discard the grease if you do choose to use it for cooking your meat and wash it well before making dog treats.) 

Why should you make these treats? 

NO ALLERGENS

Buster is practically allergic ot everything under the sun. Even when I buy dog treats for him at the store, there are only a few different treats that he can have, sadly. These homemade dog treats are made with only two ingredients, so you won’t have to worry about any allergy issues!

QUALITY INGREDIENTS

Even when we buy good dog treats at the store, it can still be hard to tell exactly what is in them or the exact quality of the ingredients. These homemade dog treats only have 2 ingredients, and you can even opt to purchase organic options!

QUANTITY

I don’t even know what else to say here. You get 500 treats for only about 5 minutes worth of work! These treats will keep for several weeks in the fridge, so you don’t have to worry about them going bad. These are perfect to have on hand. Who knows, maybe you’ll feel inspired and motivated to grab a handful and have a training session!

I know your dog will absolutely love these, but if you make them, will ou please do me a favor and leave me a comment below and let me know what you and your dog think? I’d appreciate it!


Easy Homemade Dog Treats with 2 Ingredients

This is a quick and easy recipe for 500 homemade dog treats using only 2 ingredients.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time28 mins

Equipment

  • Pyramid pan

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup coconut flour
  • 3/4 cup peanut butter, creamy
  • 1 1/4 cup water

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • In a large bowl, mix the flour and peanut butter together.
  • Slowly add in the water until you get the consistency of pancake batter. This was about 1 and 1/4 cups of water for me.
  • Spread the batter onto the pyramid pan sheet with a spatula. Gently use the edge of the spatula to ensure there are no airbubbles in the pyramids. You also want to ensure there is as little batter as possible connecting the treats.
  • Bake until done, about 28 minutes.
  • Once cooled, gently shake the pyramid pan onto a cookie sheet. All of your treats should easily fall out!
  • Store leftover treats in the fridge.
    easy homemade dog treats

Notes

The batter in this recipe makes enough to fill the two pyramid pans, which is about 1,000 treats. These will easily keep for 3-4 weeks in the refrigerator, but if you only want to make one pyramid pan's worth of treats, then cut this recipe in half. 

5 Tips to Train Your Puppy

5 Tips to Train Your Puppy

It seems that this general time of year is the puppy time. With the holidays just finishing up and spring on its way, I bet a lot of you have puppies in your lives or are considering getting a puppy. Is a puppy the right answer for you? Puppies are hard work; there is no doubt about that. There are lots of accidents, lots of sleepless nights, lots of bite-y behavior, and lots of rushing outside to potty train in bad weather. But, those negatives can absolutely be outweighed by the joy and satisfaction from training a dog from puppyhood to adulthood, if that’s your thing. If you are seriously interested in dog training, are a dog trainer, want to compete in sports with your pup, then a puppy may be the right answer for you. For most people that just want an excellent family companion that isn’t quite as much work, then likely, adopting a young adult or even a senior dog is probably the better option. Whether you’ve decided to get a puppy or an adult, these 5 training tips will be applicable and help you in your journey with your new dog.

5 TIPS TO TRAIN YOUR PUPPY

#1 – Crate Train

Crate training is essential for any and all dogs. I guarantee you will need to crate your dog at least one time within his life – whether he’s kenneled while you’re on vacation, has to be hospitalized, needs to be contained when you have family or friends over, etc. It is so much easier if you have already exposed and trained your dog to love his crate.

Here are a few general tips to crate train your dog:

  1. Never, ever use the crate as punishment. Do not put shut your dog in the crate after yelling at them for doing something wrong.
  2. Always give your dog some sort of safe chew inside the crate. I recommend the Extreme black Kongs, either Large or XL. You can fill them with some peanut butter, canned food, pumpkin, kibble soaked in water or broth, etc.
  3. When you first introduce the crate, only keep your dog in there for short periods of time with the aforementioned chew. Gradually increase the time the dog is inside the crate over several weeks.
  4. Only open the crate when your dog is being quiet. If your dog is whining or barking, wait for just 1-2 seconds of quiet and then open the crate.

#2 – Muzzle Train

Similar to crate training, it always a good idea to muzzle train all of your dogs. All dogs have teeth, which means that all dogs have the ability and potential to bite. In an event of a true emergency, it is much easier for veterinary staff to administer emergency first aid if your dog is muzzled. Your dog will also be less stressed if they are already familiar with the muzzle.

 Here are some general tips in muzzle training your dog: 

  1. Choose the right muzzle. I recommend a basket style that allows the dog to pant, drink, and take treats.
  2. Start slow. Allow your dog to sniff the muzzle on the ground. Hold the muzzle in your hand, and give your dog a treat for simply sniffing or getting near the muzzle. Eventually, work up to placing the muzzle on their face for 1-2 seconds while treating.
  3. Using spray cheese or a wet food mixture in a squeeze tube may be easier to squeeze through the muzzle instead of trying to shove small pieces of hard treats inside.
  4. Allow your dog to wear the muzzle occasionally in other places outside of the vet or other “scary” situation. For example, allow your dog to wear the muzzle for just 1-2 minutes on a leisurely walk or while inside the house training.

 

#3 – Clicker Train

Clicker training is a beautiful thing! The clicker enables very clearly defined communication between you and your dog. The click should be applied at the exact moment the dog does the behavior you are looking for, and the dog learns exactly that! After you click, you will reward your dog. The dog learns that the click means he did the correct thing. This very clear communication allows other aspects of training to happen quicker and faster.

Here are some general tips for clicker training your dog: 

  1. The mechanics can be challenging, so learn them on your own without your dog. I recommend holding your clicker and treat and demonstrating on yourself. Learn to click at the correct time. For example, go from a standing to seated position on a chair, and learn to click the second your butt hits the chair.
  2. Get used to holding the clicker, leash, and treats without your dog so you are comfortable.
  3. Practice holding the clicker, leash, and treats with your dog inside the house or in your fenced in backyard before you try to go on a walk.
  4. You will need to “load the clicker” with your dog, and teach your dog what the clicker means. Likely, your dog already knows how to sit, so just start using the clicker the moment your dog’s butt hits the ground. Do a few repetitions for a few days, just so you can teach your dog what the clicker means.

#4 – Train a Collar Grab

 There will be times in life that you will need to grab your dog by his collar, likely for his own safety. From a dog’s perspective, this can be a terrifying and threatening thing! They are happily wandering around and all of a sudden a human hoovers over them and applies pressure to their neck. Many dogs will instinctively react negatively to this and could potentially even bite. You want to teach your dog that collar grabs are not scary or threatening, and in fact, mean food is coming!

Here are some tips for teaching a collar grab:

  1. Starting inside in a familiar room, simply extend your hand towards (but do not touch) your dog’s collar, and give your dog a treat. Repeat several times for 1-2 days.
  2. Once your dog is comfortable, extend your hand, lightly touch your dog’s collar, immediately remove your hand, and reward your dog. Repeat several times for 1-2 days.
  3. Once your dog is comfortable, extend your hand, lightly grab your dog’s collar for 1-2 seconds, let go, and reward.
  4. Once your dog is comfortable, grab your dog’s collar lightly and walk 1-2 steps while luring with food, and then reward.

#5 – Train a Recall

If you only teach your dog one thing, let it be a recall! Every dog needs to know a recall, and in some cases, it could actually save his life.

Here are some tips to train a recall:

  1. Pick a word (also known as a cue) that you only use for recall and don’t often use in everyday language. This will maintain clarity for your dog. Many people use the word “come” or the phrase “come here,” and while that may work, I would recommend a unique word if possible.
  2. Train the recall inside your house in a familiar environment before trying it outside. Start small – only call your dog from a few feet away before widening the distance.
  3. Train your recall outside in your back yard from square one from only 1-2 feet away, no matter how well your dog is doing inside.
  4. Make sure you aren’t only using the recall to call your dog to you to end fun behavior. For example, if you allow your dog off leash, don’t only call your dog when you are getting ready to leash him up to put him in the car to go home. Call him to you at least 2-3 times throughout the walk just to give your dog a treat and let him go back off on his merry way again off leash.

Do you have a new puppy or dog? What are you working on? If you follow my tips and start training these five behaviors, let me know how it works out for you!